This Week in BrewZasters: Latest batch of house pale unveiled

A short month ago we here at Flogthis Brewing brewed up our flagship pale ale recipe (available here, and here, the recipe, not the beer). Since the only way to tell if a change works is to keep everything else constant and judge against a previous batch, this last batch had 1 ounce of Sinamar added to the 10 gallon batch. I like how it looks and it doesn’t have that syrupy characteristic that I associate with caramel/crystal malt.

Our ribbon-winning House Pale Ale.

Our award-winning (a 2nd place ribbon from a regional event is an award, right?) House Pale Ale.

The first thing you notice is the color which is a golden amber with a white-ish head that stays for several minutes. The aroma has citrus, pine, floral scents. The first sips reveals a bitterness that is balanced with a bready malt flavor though there may be a hint of astringency in the aftertaste. I’ve been putting gypsum in the mash, which gives a better yield and makes the bitterness shine. Should I cut back on gypsum? Should I add some crystal/caramel malt? Should I cut back on my bittering hops? Or should I mash at 156F (68.9C) to give more body (but may give it that syrupy taste)? I can do only one of these, if I do more then I would not know which worked, or worse yet, which did not work.

Brewers Association loathes FDA’s proposal‏

Aside

…with good reason.

Mashing grains within a mesh grain bag

Under a proposed FDA rule, any brewery‘s spent grain could not be used as animal feed unless it were “treated.”

As I noted last Friday under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the FDA has proposed onerous regulations to severely limit  use of spent grain for animal feed. Because grain used in the brewing process is frequently donated or sold at low cost to farmers for animal feed, the FDA proposal would affect hundreds of brewers across the country. The Brewers Association issued the following statement on the FDA animal feed proposal:

The current rule proposal represents an unwarranted burden for all brewers. Many of the more than 2,700 small and independent craft breweries that operate throughout the United States provide spent grain to local farms for use as animal feed. The proposed FDA rules on animal feed could lead to significantly increased costs and disruption in the handling of spent grain. Brewers of all sizes must either adhere to new processes, testing requirements, recordkeeping and other regulatory requirements or send their spent grain to landfills, wasting a reliable food source for farm animals and triggering a significant economic and environmental cost.

Absent evidence that breweries’ spent grains as currently handled cause any hazards to animals or humans, the proposed rules create new and onerous burdens for brewers and for farmers who may no longer receive spent grain and will have to purchase additional feed. Farmers also appreciate the ‘wet’ grains from breweries because it helps provide hydration for the animals.

Brewers’ grains have been used as cattle feed for centuries, and the practice is generally considered safe. We ask the FDA to conduct a risk assessment of the use of spent brewers’ grain by farmers prior to imposing expensive new regulations and controls.

Enhanced by Zemanta

FDA’s Rx for Brewers: Head>Desk>Hit>Repeat.

Your federal tax dollars at work.

Slide1
Protecting innocent farmers and their livestock from the dangers lurking in…wait for it…spent grains.

 

“Breweries would be required to dry and package spent grain before it could be given or sold to farmers to use as feed.” -According to at Reason.com.”

 

All made possible due to:

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the most sweeping reform of our food safety laws in more than 70 years, [which] was signed into law by President Obama on January 4, 2011. It aims to ensure the U.S. food supply is safe by shifting the focus from responding to contamination to preventing it. – FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) website

Well obviously some busybody at FDA got a wild hair and came up with the, “FSMA Proposed Rule to Establish Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals.” yes as unbelievable as it sounds the FDA has decided that a practice that has been going on for three or four decades could be dangerous, mon dieu! Heaven forbid! Furthermore, I don’t feel that if this went through I would be any safer. In fact, after seeing this proposed regulation I’m in danger of losing my lunch.

I could be wrong, after all I have been wrong before, but this strikes me as first rate bureaucrat-shit-crazy.  It’s a big fucking deal, to paraphrase VP Joe Biden.

Consider, Shipyard, Maine’s largest brewer. It produces 400-600 tons of spent grain per week during times of peak production.

This may be worth writing to your Congresscritter and expressing your disappointment in how your tax dollars or being spent.

Further reading:

FDA moves to stop sharing between beer makers and farmers
http://reason.com/blog/2014/03/28/fda-new-rules-on-spent-grains-for-farms

A rule change proposed by the FDA could jeopardize a relationship between farmers and brewers.
http://portland.wcsh6.com/news/news/1165073-rule-change-proposed-fda-could-jeopardize-relationship-between-farmers-and-brewers

FDA rules make it nearly impossible for beer makers to give their grain to farmers for feed
http://boingboing.net/2014/03/28/fda-rules-make-it-nearly-impos.html

Sustainable Uses of Spent Grain
http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-muses/sustainable-uses-of-spent-grain

FSMA Proposed Rule to Establish Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals
http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/ucm366510.htmwho

Enhanced by Zemanta

If yeast ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy

I came across a 2012 article posted by the American Academy of Microbiology. It is an FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on yeast titled, If the Yeast ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy. And, far from being written in obfuscating sciency prose, it is written down-to-earth language even I can understand. This is not to say that it is not science-based.

FAQ reports [by the American Academy of Microbiology] are based on the deliberations of 15-20 expert scientists who gather for a day to develop science-based answers to questions the public might have about topics in microbiology. The reports are reviewed by all participants, and by outside experts, and every effort is made to ensure that the information is accurate and complete.

It is chockablock full of good information on brewers yeast, party because the Pope of Foam, Charles Bamforth, Ph.D., D.Sc. of University of California Davis Department of Food Science and Technology; Chris White, Ph.D., of White Labs; and Katherine Smart, Ph.D. of SABMiller are on the steering committee.

Here is the link to the PDF: http://academy.asm.org/images/stories/documents/ColloquiaDoc/faq_beer.pdf

Enhanced by Zemanta

Hops chart

Put me in coach I’m ready to play.

I just added a link to Brew Your Owns hops chart. If your looking for a description of a certain type of hop or want to know what you might use as a substitute start with their chart

English: hops in glass

Hops give beer that earthy, piney, cirtrusy or grassy flavor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

.

Enhanced by Zemanta

This Week in BrewZasters: Brewing the House Pale

Here's Big Red at 1 week old

I’m brewing the house pale ale today. The minor changes made to the 10 gallon recipe below are 20g of gypsum in the mash and 1oz of Sinamar coloring. The Sinamar addition should bring the color to near a 6 SRM.

Batch Size: 10.00 gal Style: American Pale Ale
Boil Size: 13 gal Style Guide: BJCP 2008
Color: 6 SRM Equipment: – My Keggle (15 gal capacity)
Bitterness: 41.4 IBUs Boil Time: 75 min
Est OG: 1.052 (12.8° P) Mash Profile: Single Infusion, 154F (Medium-Full Body)
Est FG: 1.014 SG (3.5° P) Fermentation: ~66F
ABV: 5.0% Taste Rating: 5 stars
17.19 gal The brewer’s water Water 1
18 lbs 5.6 oz Pale Malt (2 Row) US (1.8 SRM) Grain 2
1 lbs 4.0 oz Vienna Malt (3.5 SRM) Grain 3
13.0 oz White Wheat Malt (3.1 SRM) Grain 4
1.1 oz Galaxy [14.8%] – First Wort Hops 5
1.0 oz Cascade [5.5%] – Boil 10 min Hops 6
1.0 oz Centennial [10.0%] – Boil 10 min Hops 7
1.0 oz Cascade [5.5%] – Boil 0 min Hops 8
1.0 oz Centennial [10.0%] – Boil 0 min Hops 9
1.0 oz Sinamar color 10
4 pkgs Fermentis Safale 05 Yeast 11
2.0 oz Galaxy [14.8%] – Dry Hop 4 days Hops 12
Enhanced by Zemanta

Speed Brewing Your Six-Pack of Beer

At DFH Rehoboth Brew & Eats. Cheers.

Brew one in less than an hour. Cheers.

James Spencer and Steve Wilkes must be the nicest guys on the web. One of these days I would love to meet them. Their Basic Brewing website and (mostly James but more than occasionally Steve) podcasts are fun and informative. I really recommend the podcasts on toxicology of home brewing.

In this video they show how to brew an India Pale Ale in less than an hour (~45 minutes, not counting fermenting and bottling time). This technique will work fine for a pale ale (less hops) or a blonde (less malt and less hops).

Enhanced by Zemanta